We Can Do It! WWII Opening Day

After months of research, design, and anticipation, the History Center’s new We Can Do It! WWII exhibition will finally open to the public this Saturday, April 25, at 10 a.m.

The new exhibit, which explores Western Pennsylvania’s incredible impact on the home, industrial, and battle fronts during World War II, will be on display for several months at the museum – but why wait?

We Can Do It! WWII

Here are FIVE reasons you should attend Saturday’s Opening Day festivities.

YOU can do it!

1) Honor those who served our country: Be a part of a special receiving line welcoming dozens of World War II veterans into the museum with confetti, streamers, and mini American flags, along with live patriotic music courtesy of the Moon Area High School Band.

2) Stars and Stripes: Participate in the goosebump-inducing American flag folding ceremony at 11 a.m. with veterans, museum staff, and fellow visitors. You’ll learn how to properly fold a giant 36-foot garrison flag and feel like you’re at the Super Bowl as “The Star-Spangled Banner” blares over the sound system while you’re gripping the flag in the Great Hall.

3) Jeep Jubilee: Following a mini-motorcade with the WWII veterans on hand, take photos with several historic jeeps on display near the Three Rivers Stadium goal posts just outside of the museum.

4) The TANK. Yes, we’ll have a TANK here: Pose with a Pennsylvania-built M3 Stuart tank, provided by the First Frontier Mechanized Cavalry Division, which will be on display alongside the historic jeeps throughout the day. Boom!

5) Be the first to see We Can Do It! The 10,000-square-foot exhibit brings the 1940s to life and features more than 275 rare artifacts, stunning photography, interactive displays, immersive museum settings, and so much more.

The We Can Do It! WWII Opening Day event, sponsored by MSA Safety, is FREE for all veterans, active military, and their families. Standard History Center admission applies for regular visitors.

Brady Smith is the Director of Marketing and Communications at the History Center.

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