Disability and the Future: Conserving and Promoting Human Diversity

Friday, October 25, 2019 • 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Heinz History Center
Free and open to the public | Please register in advance

Add to Calendar10/25/2019 06:00 PM10/25/2019 08:30 PMAmerica/New_YorkDisability and the Future: Conserving and Promoting Human DiversityJoin author and celebrated disability theorist Rosemarie Garland-Thomson for an evening with disability activists, scholars, and bioethicists from across America. Heinz History CenterHeinz History CenterfalseMM/DD/YYYY

Join author and celebrated disability theorist Rosemarie Garland-Thomson for an evening at the History Center with disability activists, scholars, and bioethicists from across America.

Garland-Thomson, whose publications include “Staring: How We Look” and “Extraordinary Bodies: Figuring Physical Disability in American Culture and Literature,” will speak on the importance of the survival of human difference in an era defined by genome-editing techniques and conversations around “curing” and “preventing” disabilities.

This program is sponsored by the Heinz History Center, Western Pennsylvania Disability History and Action Consortium, American Society for Bioethics and Humanities Disability and Rehabilitation Affinity Group, AMA Journal of Ethics, Carnegie Mellon University, Center for Bioethics & Health Law, and University of Pittsburgh Departments of English, History, and Sociology.

Admission

From 6 – 7 p.m., enjoy complimentary refreshments and a cash bar at a pre-program reception, followed by the speaking program at 7 p.m.

Admission is free and open to the public, though registration is requested.

Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the program includes access to all five floors of History Center exhibitions, including Pittsburgh: A Tradition of Innovation.

Register now

Open captioning will be provided at this program.

 

Assistive listening devices will be available at this program.

 

American Sign Language interpretation will be provided at this program.

For more information, please contact Sam Moore at sjmoore@heinzhistorycenter.org or 412-454-6373.

Rosemarie Garland-Thomson is a disability justice and culture thought leader, bioethicist, teacher, and humanities scholar. Her 2016 editorial, “Becoming Disabled,” was the inaugural article in the ongoing weekly series in the New York Times about disability by people living with disabilities. She is a professor of English and bioethics at Emory University, where she teaches disability studies, bioethics, American literature and culture, and feminist theory. Her work develops the field of critical disability studies in the health humanities to bring forward disability access, inclusion, and identity to a broad range of institutions and communities. She is co-editor of “About Us: Essays from the New York Times about Disability” by People with Disabilities (forthcoming) and the author of “Staring: How We Look” and several other books. Her current project is “Embracing Our Humanity: A Bioethics of Disability and Health.”