The 1779 Bucktooth Run Battlefield

Saturday, March 9, 2019 • 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Fort Pitt Museum
$5 for adults & students | Free for History Center members | Register

Add to Calendar03/09/2019 a1:00 AM03/09/2019 01:00 PMAmerica/New_YorkThe 1779 Bucktooth Run Battlefield SiteJoin the Fort Pitt Museum for a program that will help us better understand the impact of Colonel Daniel Brodhead’s 1779 expedition up the Allegheny River into Seneca country.Heinz History CenterHeinz History CenterfalseMM/DD/YYYY

This program is sponsored by the Seneca Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Office.

Join the Fort Pitt Museum for a program that will help us better understand the impact of Colonel Daniel Brodhead’s 1779 expedition up the Allegheny River into Seneca country.

Dr. Joe Stahlman will discuss a recent project in which he and Dr. Douglas Perrelli from the University of Buffalo, in collaboration with Seneca Nation Tribal Heritage Preservation Office (THPO), examined available oral histories, historic maps, and secondary archival resources to understand the impacts of Col. Daniel Brodhead’s 1779 expedition.

Over the years, there have been hints that an unrecorded skirmish occurred on Seneca lands along the Allegheny River – the only battle on Seneca Nation territory. During the 1779 Sullivan-Clinton campaign, Washington ordered Brodhead to subdue British Native allies, the Munsee and Seneca, and possibly meet up with the westward marching American campaign.

For more information see the History Center’s blog – Fort Pitt During the Revolutionary War: General Brodhead’s Expedition – and Pittsburgh Quarterly Magazine – What Happened at Thompson’s Island?

Admission

Admission to this Fort Pitt Speaker Series program is $5 for adults and students and is free for History Center members. Please register in advance.

Register now

For more information, please contact Kathleen Lugarich at kmlugarich@heinzhistorycenter.org or 412-454-6418.

About Dr. Joe Stahlman

Dr. Joe Stahlman is a Haudenosaunee researcher and lecturer. In 2014, he earned his PhD in Anthropology at Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind. He has over two decades of research and work experience in anthropology and archaeology related endeavors, most of which revolve around the indigenous peoples of Turtle Island. Much of his recent research blends historical archives, oral histories, archeological fieldwork, anthropological methodologies, and indigenous worldviews.

Seneca Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Office