Captivity Narrative: Nimrod Ashby

In April 1764, Captain Nimrod Ashby was in the command of a militia group and given a sum from the Treasurer of Virginia to pay him and his men and to reimburse him for his expenses. In May, he and his hunting companion were robbed and killed by a band of Delaware Indians near Furman’s Fort on the Potomac River. Ashby’s father and wife both petitioned the Virginia House of Burgesses for compensation, but the House judged he had not been proven dead and denied the petitions.

Below is Frances Ashby’s petition to the Virginia House of Burgesses.

That a Petition of Frances Ashby setting forth that her deceased Husband Nimrod Ashby, commanded a Company of Militia on the Frontiers in the Year 1763; that he was under the Necessity to advance his own Credit to furnish the Militia with Cloathes, and other Things fit for the Service; that he employed certain Persons as Pilots, or Runners, who with several others empowered him to draw their Pay, which he did, and on his Return to the Frontiers was attacked by a Party of Indians, who murdered him, and took from him all his Money, to the Amount of Sixty six or sixty seven Pounds; and praying the Relief of his House, was referred to the Consideration of the then next Session of Assembly.

Additional petitions and the sessions of the Virginia House of Burgesses from 1766-1769 can be found here.