Article
Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum

“It’ll Take an Army” Franco’s Italian Army Fifty Years Later

Read the Story

Making History Blog

10 Results found for: General

Reset

Title IX at 50

  “Title IX has done more for women than anything since the 19th Amendment…I thought from the very beginning the most valuable results of Title IX would come through academic equality, only a small part of the student body has a chance to play athletics.”               Former U.S. Senator Birch Bayh (1)  The enactment of…

Pittsburgh’s John Kane Q&A: Meet Guest Curator Louise Lippincott

When the History Center decided to pursue an exhibition on the life and work of Pittsburgh painter John Kane – Louise Lippincott’s name kept coming up in conversation. A historian and former art curator, Louise, who goes by “Lulu,” managed the largest John Kane collection in the United States at the Carnegie Museum of Art,…

Samuel A. Musgrave: Industrial Photographer for Hire

  Samuel Musgrave portrait, 1952 Working behind the scenes for many of Pittsburgh’s leading companies, Samuel A. Musgrave captured an extensive visual record of Western Pennsylvania’s postwar economy.  As a freelance industrial photographer, Musgrave spent five decades taking promotional images in factories, showrooms, and storefronts across the region. His clients included household names like Alcoa,…

From Pickles to Planes: Women Lead Glider Production for Heinz During WWII

They came from all walks of life. Margaret Evans was an artist’s model from Greentree. Mrs. Grace Winters was a widow with three small children. Mrs. Louise Hamilton came from a farm in Moon Run, accompanied by her daughter Louise. Olga Radosevich yearned to join her sister Sophie in the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps, but…

The McGinnis Sisters Special Food Stores: Remembering a Connection Between Mother and Daughters

Local businesses become part of the fabric of a community, especially those related to food and groceries. Customers sample new products, exchange recipes, and pick up ingredients needed for cherished family traditions, year after year. Such places aren’t just part of the community, they create their own community. The History Center has long been interested…

The “Little” Penn Theater

  Perhaps the only photo of the theater shows author Paul (age 12) with his uncle Ben Siegal in 1944. Courtesy of Carol Horowitz. by Paul Roth The principal business of my branch in the Roth Family was the Penn, a moving picture theater owned and operated by my grandfather, Israel (Joe) Roth. This was…

The History and Legacy of the Freedom House

  Freedom House Ambulance Service first day, Presbyterian University Hospital, Pittsburgh, c. June 16, 1968. Gift of Virginia “Ginny” Caligiuri. A white paper report in 1966, “Accidental Death and Disability: The Neglected Disease of Modern Society,” documented the lack of emergency medical care and health disparities across the U.S. It found that African Americans had…

Fred Lenn: The Battling Boxer

  Fred Lenn fought in two arenas—as a Marine serving during World War II and Korea, and in the ring as a champion amateur and professional boxer. The second of nine children born to Polish immigrant parents in 1914, Lenn grew up on Pittsburgh’s South Side. Christened Walter Frederick Lenkowski at St. Stanislaus Polish Catholic…

Have Fun but Remember the War: Halloween during World War II

  With the History Center’s traveling exhibit “We Can Do It: WWII” returning to Barensfeld Gallery, it seemed a good time to celebrate the upcoming Halloween holiday by looking back on how this haunting season was experienced during World War II. In fact, Halloween in the war years laid the groundwork for what the holiday became during the Baby Boom.  Pranks Discouraged  Excerpt from the Halloween pledge…

Colin Powell: A Soul Soldier’s Life

  In 2006, I was busy working on a new exhibit, Soul Soldiers: African Americans and the Vietnam Era. The exhibit would go on to win regional, statewide, and national awards and travel to seven American cities from 2008 to 2011. Soul Soldiers was seen by over 450,000 visitors to museums in Chicago, Richmond, Birmingham, Memphis, Cleveland, Dallas, and Philadelphia. It was recognized…