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Pittsburgh’s John Kane: Coming to America

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Acorns for Dinner: Finding Food in Prehistoric Pennsylvania

  A walk in Squirrel Hill is always pleasant, but as I followed the sidewalk yesterday after a summer of ethnobotanical study, I looked at the plants growing along the street with fresh eyes. Take the oaks (Quercus), for instance, as prominent in this city neighborhood—where they sustain the squirrels that give it its name—as…

Exploring Holiday Culinary Identity, an Intern’s Story

This post recounts the experience of a History Center curatorial intern as he discovered the meaning of his own cultural heritage through his assistance with the A Very Merry Pittsburgh exhibition. The Heinz History Center is one of my favorite things about living in Pittsburgh. This city and its surrounding region are full of unique…

The Vietnam War: The Press on the Front Lines

  Take a trip through The Vietnam War: 1945-1975 exhibition at the History Center to become immersed in the history and significance of one of America’s most controversial conflicts. Along with hundreds of important objects, the exhibit showcases stunning and influential photography that often swayed public opinion of the war. Here’s a look at the…

The Food of Fallingwater: A Look at the Elsie Henderson Papers and Photographs

Elsie Henderson stands alongside a portrait of Edgar Kaufmann, Sr. during a visit to Fallingwater. Elsie Henderson Papers and Photographs, Detre Library & Archives, Heinz History Center. Food leaves a lasting impact on regional cultures in the form of cuisines that are very tangible results of making do with what is available in a specific…

Pull Up A Chair at the History Center

Pittsburgh, known for its many bridges, spirited sports fans, and friendly citizens, wants you to know just how welcomed you are here. There’s a common love for all things Pittsburgh at the History Center, so when our friends at VisitPITTSBURGH launched their new “Pull Up a Chair” campaign, we decided it’s the perfect time to…

Rachel Carson: The Pursuit of a Better Environment

A fair share of important figures emerged from Pittsburgh’s history. One of the most courageous and influential women to come from the region is Rachel Carson, the namesake of one of Pittsburgh’s famous Three Sisters Bridges. Born in 1907, Carson grew up a little over 10 miles north of the city on a farm in…

Top Spots for Kids at the Heinz History Center

School is over and the kids are home for the summer. There’s no better way to entertain them than by stopping by the Heinz History Center for a day of history-filled fun. Thanks to UPMC, every Sunday in June kids receive free admission to the History Center. Enjoy a day at the History Center with…

The Steel Woman of the Steel City: Catherine Baker Knoll

Four seemingly dissimilar objects actually tell the rich and complex story of an iconic Pennsylvania woman. A blue overcoat, a green inaugural gown, a black and gold Pittsburgh Steelers boa, and a leather motorcycle jacket unveil the strength and sincerity found in the multifaceted life of the late Lieutenant Governor Catherine Baker Knoll. Early Life…

Congressman James Fulton: Strong on Space

President Kennedy signs National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Authorizations, July 21, 1961. Congressman Fulton shakes the President’s hand after he signed the funding bill for NASA. Courtesy of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum; photo by Robert Knudsen. Pittsburgh doesn’t seem to be an obvious place to be home to one of the…

Gobbling Up Thanksgiving with Pittsburgh Flare

L.E. Smith Glass Company produced the first glass turkeys in 1943. Capable of holding soup, candy, or even cranberry sauce, this glass bird is an excellent table decoration for the holidays. Gift of L.E. Smith Glass Company. Thanksgiving Day is a time for celebrating with friends and family, but it’s also a national holiday where…