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“It’ll Take an Army” Franco’s Italian Army Fifty Years Later

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Who is There to Mourn for Logan?

  During the days preceding April 30th of 1774, a brutal massacre of American Indians was being plotted by about two dozen frontier malcontents roughly 40 miles northwest from Pittsburgh. Tensions in the Ohio Country between the Native inhabitants and the steady tide of frontier settlers were already running high. Encouraged by vague warnings of…

The African American Experience in Pittsburgh, Virginia – Part 2

  This is a continuation of a series on the African American experience in Pittsburgh, Virginia. Click here to read part 1. Benjamin Henry Latrobe, An overseer doing his duty near Fredericksburg, Virginia, c. 1798. Maryland Historical Society. Though Latrobe observed and painted in Virginia near the end of the 18th century, such a scene…

The African American Experience in Pittsburgh, Virginia – Part 1

  James Peachey, detail, View of Three Rivers taken from the Road leading to Pont du Lac, 1784, British Library. Though a Canadian scene, such encampments of American Indians were common on the Ohio River and its tributaries in the 18th century. Research for Pittsburgh, Virginia—the Fort Pitt Museum’s new exhibition that explores the roots…

The G. Biler / Fort Duquesne Powder Horn

  The G. Biler horn features a carving Fort Duquesne as it appeared when Forbes’ army arrived in November 1758, the name “G. Biler,” and the initials “G.B.” Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Gift of the Friends of Fort Pitt Museum. A Plan of Fort Duquesne, now call’d Pittsburgh. Likely made within days of the…

What to Do at Meadowcroft

  Something we often hear from first-time visitors is that they had no idea that there was so much to do here at Meadowcroft.  We are a museum that tells the story of humans using the natural resources of Cross Creek Valley for roughly 16,000 radiocarbon years (ca. 19,000 calendar years). With such an exhaustive…

5 Can’t-Miss Artifacts at Fort Pitt

  Looking for an escape from the cold this winter? Venture through Point State Park to the Fort Pitt Museum for a walk through Pittsburgh history in two floors and 12,000 square feet of exhibits. There’s a lot to see, so we picked the top five artifacts you can’t miss on your next visit to…

Wintering in the Ohio Country with James Smith

  “Portrait of Col. James Smith,” artist unknown, c. 1800-1810. Courtesy Warren J. Shonert Americana Collection, Eva G. Farris Special Collections, W. Frank Steely Library, Northern Kentucky University. James Smith’s Indian captivity narrative is a great look into life in the Ohio country in the 1750s. A large portion of his stories revolve around the…

The Delaware Treaty of 1778

  In the summer of 1778, a crisis loomed over the hills and valleys surrounding Fort Pitt. Years of broken promises and willful transgressions had weakened the bonds between American officials at Pittsburgh and the Great Lakes and Ohio Country Indians on whose friendship they desperately depended. One by one, the Mingo, Wyandot, and Shawnee…

Q&A with Re-enactor Jeremy Turner

  On Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, the Fort Pitt Museum will commemorate the 240th anniversary of the Delaware Treaty. Negotiations for the treaty took place at Fort Pitt in 1778, resulting in the first-ever treaty between the newly formed United States and an American Indian nation. To commemorate the treaty’s anniversary, the Fort Pitt Museum…

Fort Pitt During the Revolutionary War: General Brodhead’s Expedition

  The American Revolutionary War was a monumental time in history. Today, students across the nation learn about everything from the Boston Massacre and the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the creation of the U.S. Constitution. Historical events that transpired in Western Pennsylvania, however, are often overlooked. During the Revolution, routine conflicts in…