Making History: the Heinz History Center Blog
October 25, 2017

From Cucina to Grocery Store: The Evolution of Pasta-Making in American Homes

For many people, Italian American culture is synonymous with Italian food. And who could fault individuals for thinking this way, considering the pervasiveness of Italian American cuisine in the United States today. The widespread popularity of Italian food was not always the case ... The evolution of pasta-making in American homes can be traced in the History Center’s Italian American Collection through an investigation of several of our artifacts: the chitarra, the hand-crank pasta machine, and the pasta die.

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October 24, 2017

Isaly’s: A Recipe for Good Food

Everyone has a favorite Isaly's recipe — when author Brian Butko was growing up, it was Isaly’s macaroni & cheese that he looked forward to each trip. Years later, he would experiment with his own recipe, trying to recreate the taste he remembered.

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October 18, 2017

The Incredible Journey of the Steamboat New Orleans

A folk painting on display in the History Center’s Pittsburgh: A Tradition of Innovation exhibit captures one of Pittsburgh’s most important early innovations. On Oct. 20, 1811, the steamboat New Orleans set off from this place on a journey of more than 1,800 miles down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers.

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October 11, 2017

Quel Mazzolin di Fiori: I Campagnoli and the Italian American Folk Revival

Conceived by the Italian Sons and Daughters of America (ISDA) at the birth of the ethnic folk revival and the tapering of Italian immigration to the United States, I Campagnoli began as mainly first and second generation working class Italian Americans versed in the culture of their Italian-born parents; as they evolved, members of the third and fourth generation and people of mix parentage joined the troupe.

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September 27, 2017

“They’re Coming to Get You:” Night of the Living Dead

The cult classic “Night of the Living Dead,” filmed in and around Western Pa., was one of the highest grossing films in 1968 and helped to revolutionize the horror movie genre. The film’s director and producer, George Romero, attended Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie Mellon) University in Pittsburgh and later ran a small production company in Pittsburgh. Among Romero’s early projects was filming segments for WQED’s “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” before the show launched nationally in 1968.

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