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Pittsburgh’s John Kane: Coming to America

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Wait For It: Hamilton in Pittsburgh

  Alexander Hamilton. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. The last time Hamilton came to Pittsburgh, he wasn’t quite as popular. In fact, he was arguably one of the most hated men in Western Pennsylvania in the late 1700s, thanks to his liquor tax that sparked the Whiskey Rebellion. As Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit Broadway musical…

Your Ticket to the Inauguration

  For additional presidential inauguration artifacts in the History Center’s collections, please visit The Presidents in Office, an exhibit as part of Google Arts and Culture. Invitation to the presidential inauguration, 1965. Lyndon B. Johnson, MFF 1049 Detre Library & Archives at the History Center. Presidential inaugurations are meaningful moments in our country’s political history.…

Pennsylvania Women and the Vote

  On the Centennial of the 19th Amendment Today marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which made it illegal to deny citizens the right to vote based on sex. As we commemorate this landmark anniversary, let’s look back at some of the Pennsylvania women who fought…

Exploring Images of John Brown

  John Brown, by Anton Hohenstein after Martin Lawrence, published by John Smith, lithograph on paper, 1866. Currently on display in the exhibition Smithsonian’s Portraits of Pittsburgh: Works from the National Portrait Gallery. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. On July 3, 1859, abolitionist John Brown first arrived in the vicinity of Harper’s…

Resilience in Ruffles: A New Look at Pittsburgh’s Suffrage Shirtwaist Ball

  As the History Center explores the theme of resilience as part of its “History’s Helpers” initiative, it is a good time to revisit an event that has been discussed here before. Pittsburgh’s Suffrage Shirtwaist Ball, held on Nov. 10, 1916, remains a popular topic, especially as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th…

Treatment of the Portrait Miniature of Ebenezer Denny

This blog was originally posted at Art Conservation Etc. The original post can be found online here. Thank you to the following contributors: Ana Alba, Alba Art Conservation LLC; Nicole Lauletta, Registrar at the Heinz History Center; and Rhonda Wozniak, Rhonda Wozniak Objects Conservator. Before treatment, with case. Gift of Louise E. Denny Barnes, Heinz…

Nicholas Cresswell’s Journey on the Ohio in 1775

Benjamin Henry Latrobe, View from the Packet Wharf at Frenchtown Looking Down Elk Creek. Though painted years later and many miles to the east, this watercolor provides a good depiction of a round log cabin, the first housing constructed by most settlers in the Ohio Country. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The years…

Who is There to Mourn for Logan?

During the days preceding April 30th of 1774, a brutal massacre of American Indians was being plotted by about two dozen frontier malcontents roughly 40 miles northwest from Pittsburgh. Tensions in the Ohio Country between the Native inhabitants and the steady tide of frontier settlers were already running high. Encouraged by vague warnings of a…

Rules of Civility and Social Distancing

Statue of Washington and Guyasuta on Mt. Washington. Courtesy of Lynne Squilla. When George Washington was a boy, he copied into his notebook over one hundred Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation. Most of these rules he copied or adapted from well-known publications. But they became his own rules of conduct…

The Riot of Cliftonville

Saledka Mine of Cliftonville after the Battle. A&M 2139, Lee Collection, courtesy of the West Virginia and Regional History Collection, West Virginia University Libraries. The area that was once the small mining village of Cliftonville, W.Va., sits about four miles from Avella, Pa., just across the state’s western border. Today, if you could reach the…